Jeopardise…

Jeopardise is a great word – looking at the spelling, it reminds me of leopard: a very unusual spelling pattern is being used here.  It means  putting someone or something into a position of danger, loss, harm or failure. So I would jeopardise my job if I broke the law – and a child would jeopardise their chances of having a playtime if they cheeked their teacher. Miscellaneous is a word that just feels great when you say it – and you feel clever if you can spell it! It means various or varied – and often is used about gathering together a set of different items; so you could say, ‘he had a bunch of miscellaneous coins in his pocket’ or ‘some miscellaneous crayons in his pencil case’.

Quaint from the Y6 class means picturesque, charming or sweet – when I am driving through the country and I come across a beautiful little village, I might say ‘how quaint‘. I also like the word gravity because it has different meanings. Obviously, gravity is that force that pulls an object down, but it also means something that is serious – so I might speak to a parent with gravity if I were excluding their child from school. I know that Y4 are looking at a text about the sun at the moment because two classes have chosen sun-related words: Miss Moseley’s have used photosphere which is the sun’s outer shell from which light is radiated. Finally, the word countenance means a person’s facial expression: Mr Brian wore a grave countenance when he excluded the naughty child. See if you can learn to spell these words and to use them in your writing…